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Policjant polskiego pochodzenia zamordowany w Ottawie

Po raz pierwszy od roku 1983 zginął na służbie policjant w Ottawie. Okazało się, że to był Kanadyjczyk polskiego pochodzenia Ireneusz (Eric) Czappnik, wiek 51 lat, który przyjechał na stałe do Kanady w roku 1990. Osierocił czworo dzieci. Był chyba najstarszym, lub jednym z najstarszych wiekiem, absolwentem szkoły policyjnej, gdyż wstąpił do policji jako 48-latek. Był dumnym Kanadyjczykiem polskiego pochodzenia, kontynuującym rodzinne tradycje służby mundurowej - jego ojciec pracował przez ponad 30 lat w milicji w Polsce. Okazało się, że jego zabójcą jest były oficer RCMP, który kilka lat temu zamieszany był w groźby zabójstwa biskupa mormońskiego w Regina, Saskatchewan. Rodzice Czapnika oraz jego siostra mieszkają w Warszawie.

Czapnik siedział w oznakowanym aucie policyjnym w pobliżu izby przyjęć pogotowia szpitala Civic Hospital, wypisywał raport związany z wezwaniem w innej sprawie, gdy został zaatakowany nożem myśliwskim przez Kevina Gregsona, 43 lata - byłego oficera RCMP, który został zawieszony w roku 2006. Z pomocą nadbiegli sanitariusze oraz przechodnie. Dzięki ich akcji ujęto mordercę, oraz szybko przetransportowali rannego do szpitala. Niestety liczne rany cięte w głowę i szyję nie pozwoliły uratować pacjenta, mimo szybkiej akcji całego zespołu szpitalnego.

Poniżej informacje z mediów kanadyjskich.



Mountie held in Ottawa officer's slaying

Slain officer is a father of four

By Meghan Hurley, Ottawa Citizen, December 29, 2009 6:38 PM

OTTAWA - The Ottawa police officer fatally stabbed early Tuesday morning was a Polish immigrant who had served with the department for three years after joining the force late in life.

Const. Ireneusz "Eric" Czapnik, 51, was sitting in his police cruiser outside the emergency department of the Ottawa Hospital's Civic campus at about 4:30 a.m. when he was attacked and stabbed.

The suspect arrested Tuesday in the stabbing death is believed to be an RCMP officer, Kevin Gregson, who has a history of violence.

"Like his father, (Czapnik) was proud to be a police officer and enjoyed serving this community in particular," said Ottawa police Chief Vern White at a news conference Tuesday afternoon.

Czapnik immigrated to Canada from Poland in 1990 where his father had served as a police officer for more than 30 years, according to a family statement. His parents and sister still live in Warsaw, where Czapnik was born.

"Today we are faced with the loss of Eric, a police officer; and we grieve the loss of a husband, a father of four children, a brother and a son," the family wrote. "He was an engaged and dedicated police officer who truly enjoyed working with the community."

White said Czapnik joined the police force at age 48, after working in the retail sector for a number of years. He was one of the oldest recruits the department had ever hired.

He had previously also worked in Poland as an aircraft mechanic, and in Greece in construction.

Speaking Tuesday afternoon, Gregson's lawyer, Israel Gencher, said that his client was still being questioned at the police station. "I don't know what stage they're in," he said.

Gencher said his client would likely appear in court on Wednesday morning, "at which time he will have a brief appearance." He also said police treat every homicide as important, but given the circumstances, he expects investigators will want to be "very thorough" as they probe the stabbing.

White said there was no known relationship between Czapnik and the suspect in custody, who he refused to name prior to formal charges being laid. White said he was "confident" charges would be laid by Tuesday evening.
In an update made to his Facebook account Monday night, Gregson — who joined the Mounties in 1998 — appeared defeated: "Life sometimes just runs you over — it doesn't matter how hard you try," he wrote.

Gregson worked as an RCMP officer in Saskatchewan where he threatened to kill an official of the Mormon church in Regina in 2006 after being denied a pass that would give him, a non-Mormon, access to a Mormon temple.

Gregson, who was off-duty at the time, pulled a knife and told the bishop he had been trained to kill in many different ways. Gregson pleaded guilty to uttering death threats and was given a conditional discharge, in part because he was diagnosed with cysts in his brain several months after the incident. He has since undergone brain surgery, and his lawyer, David Bishop, says the judge took that into consideration.

Gregson went through a native addictions counselling program at Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., and became an orderly at a mental hospital there.

Czapnik is the first Ottawa officer to die in the line of duty since 1983, when Const. David Utman was shot in an altercation at a shopping centre.

Earlier in the day, a visibly shaken White said the officer died at 5:30 a.m., despite the efforts of paramedics and hospital staff.

The suspect was subdued by two nearby paramedics and quick-thinking bystanders, White said.
White said Czapnik was at the hospital to follow up on an unrelated incident, and was likely writing up his notes inside the cruiser.

"It's with great sadness that I'm here before you today," White said. "Please let me express my deepest sympathy to the family and friends of the officer and the family of the Ottawa Police Service who are dealing with this tragedy."
White also said condolence books would be available for the public to sign at most police offices throughout the city.

Funeral arrangements were being made by the family, he added.

"I have to say I think I've received hundreds of e-mails today, not only from partners in what we do, but also from the community," White said. "It shows what a great relationship we have, but it's challenging when the relationship has been broken, as it has been here."

Provincial and municipal politicians also offered condolences to the family and community.

"Our community is in shock at this senseless crime. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the family of this officer and this will support them in the difficult days ahead," said Ottawa Mayor Larry O'Brien, adding that city flags would be lowered to half-mast.

Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty said: "Tragedies like this one remind us of the dangers that Ontario police officers face every day. We are grateful for their courage and their sacrifice — and for the loving support of families who stand behind them. We stand with them in mourning the tragic death of Const. Czapnik."

Yellow police crime tape blocked off the area outside the emergency department's door where ambulances deliver their patients. A police officer's pistol and a black-handled knife could be seen near a pool of blood on the ground behind an Ottawa police cruiser.

Some officers gathered at the scene to mourn Czapnik's death spoke of the sombre atmosphere at Ottawa's police headquarters.

"People (are) tiptoeing by and (there's) no joking around like you typically see," White said. "In the service, it is a sense of mourning.

"Whether you knew the officer or not doesn't matter. You lost a family member. That's exactly the way we feel about it and so it's noticeable."

The emergency room remained open throughout the incident, said Nicolas Ruszkowski, vice-president of communications for the hospital.

With files from Canwest News Service, Global News, Saskatoon StarPhoenix

© Copyright (c) Canwest News Service



Police officer killed. Wywiad z szefem policji w Ottawie Vern White
(kliknij na zdjęcie poniżej)



Ottawa Police news conference. Konferencja prasowa policji ottawskiej.
(kliknij na zdjęcie poniżej)





Statement from family of Constable Ireneusz "Eric" Czapnik
December 29, 2009

Today we are faced with the loss of Eric, a police officer and we grieve the loss of a husband, a father of four children, a brother and a son.

Eric, who worked for 3 years as an Ottawa police officer, was a proud Polish Canadian who came to Canada in 1990. He was an engaged and dedicated police officer who truly enjoyed working in the community. He was a proud officer following in the footsteps of his father who was also an officer for over 30 years in Poland.

This is a most difficult time for our family. We would like to ask the media and the public to respect our privacy during this time.

Thank you.
the Czapnik Family



Slain Ottawa officer identified; Mountie held in stabbing
By Meghan Hurley, The Ottawa CitizenDecember 29, 2009 6:07 PM

OTTAWA - The Ottawa police officer fatally stabbed early Tuesday morning was following in the footsteps of his father, who worked as an officer for 30 years in Poland.

Eric Czapnik, 51, left his job as the manager of a retail store to pursue a career as a police officer, Ottawa police Chief Vern White said during a press conference Tuesday afternoon. Czapnik, who immigrated to Canada from Poland in 1990, worked as an officer for three years.

A visibly shaken White read a statement prepared by Czapnik's family.

"Today we are faced with the loss of Eric, a police officer, and we grieve the loss of a husband, father of four children, a brother and a son," White said. "He was an engaged and dedicated police officer who truly enjoyed working with the community."

White said funeral arrangements are being made and will be made public as soon as they are finalized.

Czapnik was sitting in his police cruiser outside the Emergency Department of the Ottawa Hospital's Civic Campus at about 4:30 a.m. when he was attacked and stabbed.

The man arrested in connection with the attack is believed to be an RCMP officer named Kevin Gregson.

Gregson's lawyer, Israel Gencher, said Tuesday afternoon that his client was still being questioned at the police station "as far as I know."

"I don't know what stage they're in," he said. Gencher, who spoke to Gregson Tuesday morning, said it seemed unlikely that his client would appear in court in the afternoon.

Gencher said Gregson will likely appear in court on Wednesday morning, "at which time he will have a brief appearance." Gencher said he hopes at that time he will get some of the initial disclosure in the case.

Gregson worked as an RCMP officer in Saskatchewan where he threatened to kill an official of the Mormon church in Regina in 2006 after being denied some sort of special pass that would give him, a non-Mormon, access to a Mormon temple. He was off-duty at the time.

Gregson, who was off-duty at the time, pulled a knife and told the bishop he had been trained to kill in many different ways. Gregson was given a conditional discharge, in part because he was diagnosed with cysts in his brain several months after the incident. He has since undergone brain surgery, and his lawyer, David Bishop, says the judge took that into consideration.
Gregson went through a native addictions counselling program at Sault Ste Marie and became an orderly at a mental hospital there.

Gregson pleaded guilty to uttering death threats and was given a conditional discharge.

Const. Czapnik is the first city officer to die in the line of duty since 1983.

A visibly shaken Police Chief Vern White said at a Tuesday morning press conference that the officer died at 5:30 a.m., despite the efforts of paramedics and hospital staff.

The suspect was subdued by two nearby paramedics and quick-thinking bystanders, White said.

White said the slain officer was at the hospital for an unrelated incident.

"It's great sadness that I'm here before you today," White said at a media briefing Tuesday morning. "Please let me express my deepest sympathy to the family and friends of the officer and the family of the Ottawa Police Service who are dealing with this tragedy."

The Ottawa police major crimes investigation is continuing and charges have not yet been laid against the suspect.
Yellow police crime tape blocked off the area outside the the Emergency Department's east door where ambulances deliver patients. A pistol — reportedly a pellet pistol belonging to the suspect — and a black-handled knife could be seen near a pool of blood on the ground behind an Ottawa police cruiser parked outside the ER.

The Civic Campus Emergency Room remained open throughout the incident, said Nicolas Ruszkowski, vice-president of communications for the hospital. Ruszkowski deferred all other questions to Ottawa police.

It is the first death of an Ottawa officer in the line of duty since 1983, when Const. David Utman was shot in an altercation at Bayshore Shopping Centre.

More to come...

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen



Officer's death "heartbreaking": Councillor

By Kate Jaimet, The Ottawa CitizenDecember 29, 2009

OTTAWA - Flags flew at half-staff at city hall Tuesday in honour of the Ottawa police officer stabbed to death at the Ottawa Hospital's Civic campus Tuesday morning.

"In 23 years this city never experienced a police officer being killed on duty. It was shocking news to say the least," said Councillor Eli El-Chantiry, chair of the police services board. He said Chief Vern White phoned him at 6 a.m. to tell him of the death.

He has since met with the chief, senior officers, and representatives of the Police Association to express condolences on behalf of the board and city council.

"It's heartbreaking for us. My heart, my thoughts, my prayers go to the officer and his family," he said. "We have to do what we can to support the family and the officers who serve us every day."

El-Chantiry said the flags at city hall will remain at half-staff until the funeral. Flags have also been lowered at all city fire stations.

The police are handling funeral arrangements, he said. It is not yet known whether city hall will hold an official memorial

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen



Ottawa cop's murder is first violent police death since 1983

AFP American Edition | 2009-12-29 23:10:12

An Ottawa police officer was stabbed to death Tuesday in a murder apparently committed by an ex-cop, the first time a policeman in the Canadian city has been killed in the line of duty since 1983.

The deceased officer, Eric Czapnik, 51, was a father of four who emigrated to Canada from Poland in 1990, according to Ottawa police chief Vern White.

Initial reports suggest Czapnik was murdered as he sat in his police car, writing up notes on an unrelated case in the early hours of Tuesday morning.

Police said Czapnik's attacker took him by surprise as he was parked outside an Ottawa hospital, and the pair were not thought to have exchanged words.

Two hospital personnel quickly overcame the alleged assailant, who was identified later by his lawyer as Kevin Gregson, 43, a former member of the Saskatchewan Royal Canadian Mounted Police, CBC television reported.

Czapnik was reportedly one of the eldest cadets in his police academy class and was inspired to become a police officer by his father's 30-year service in Poland's police force.



Mountie arrested in Ottawa officer's killing

Last Updated: Tuesday, December 29, 2009 | 7:38 PM ET

CBC News

The Mountie arrested in Tuesdayâ??s stabbing death of an Ottawa police officer has been under suspension after receiving a conditional discharge in 2007 on a charge of threatening a Mormon church official with a knife in Regina, CBC News has confirmed.

Kevin Gregson, 43, was arrested at the Civic Campus of the Ottawa Hospital early Tuesday after the Ottawa officer was stabbed while writing notes in his cruiser outside the emergency department

The victim was Const. Eric Czapnik, 51, a father of four who had been with the force since April 2007, police Chief Vern White told an afternoon news conference.

Czapnik, an immigrant from Poland whose father had also been a police officer, was a well-liked member of the force, White said.

He said the officer was alone at the hospital on an unrelated police matter when a man stabbed him. There was no known connection between the suspect and the officer.

"He was actually outside the hospital, preparing to leave," White said.

"Thanks to the prompt response of members of the public and, in particular, two paramedics at the scene, the suspect was apprehended," he said.

The police chief called the paramedics "heroic," hinting they may have kept others from being harmed.

"Without their assistance, I don't know what would have happened," White added.

In April 2007, Gregson pleaded guilty in a Regina court to uttering a death threat against a Mormon bishop, but received a conditional discharge when his lawyer persuaded the judge that cysts in Gregson's brain had contributed to his behaviour.
The court heard that Gregson was off duty when he approached Bishop Robert Howie about receiving what's called a "temple recommend," which allows members to enter a Mormon temple for religious ceremonies.

When the bishop told Gregson he had additional spiritual work to do before he could receive the recommendation, Gregson became angry and said: "I'm a cop, I'm not like the rest of you," according to court documents.

Gregson then pulled out a knife and said, "You don't know how many ways I've been taught to kill."

After he calmed down, Gregson left the bishop's office complaining about feeling "messed up" in his head, court heard. Several months after that incident, Gregson was diagnosed with cysts in his brain. He has since had brain surgery and been under suspension without pay from his position at the RCMP's Regina headquarters.

Czapnik 'eager, fun-loving'

Before the force released Czapnik's name Tuesday afternoon, Charles Momy, president of the Canadian Police Association, described the Ottawa officer as someone who enjoyed his work.

"He seemed to come across as a very jovial individual," said Momy, who met him briefly. "He seemed to be a very eager, fun-loving individual. [He] obviously loved his job."

Czapnik was one of the oldest officers ever hired by the Ottawa police force.

His stabbing marks the first death of an Ottawa police officer in the line of duty since 1983.

The hospital's emergency room remains open, but the area where the stabbing occurred was closed to the public. In the parking lot just outside the ER doors, an officer's gun, a knife and a large blood-stain could be seen behind police tape.

With files from The Canadian Press

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Witness JeromeN provides comments to CBCNews.ca:

"I work in the medical field, was there and was actively involved. I cannot obviously get into details out of respect for everyone, but I can at least give a realistic account, since the information people are spreading is simply sickening.

"Most import_antly, the paramedics who almost helped save the life of this cop and likely saved the lives of others by stopping this suspect should be highly commended. This officer was hurt badly, two paramedics standing outside apprehended the suspect, while another brought the officer into the trauma area of the emergency department.

"Emergency physicians, anesthesiologists and surgeons of a number of different specialties, including trauma, head and neck and general surgery, were all there helping, doing everything that could be done â?Œ" â?? Jerome N



Archival Story: Mountie admits to threatening to kill bishop

By Jana G. Pruden, Regina Leader PostDecember 29, 2009

Originally published April 4, 2007

REGINA â?? An off-duty RCMP officer has admitted to threatening the life of a Mormon bishop who took away some of his church privileges, telling the bishop: "You don't know how many ways I have been taught to kill a man."

Kevin Gregson, a nine-year veteran of the RCMP, was stressed, suicidal and confused at the time of the incident, his lawyer said Tuesday. Gregson has since received medical treatment for several cysts on his brain and is feeling better.
He pleaded guilty Tuesday to uttering a death threat.

Crown prosecutor Anthony Gerein said Gregson arrived at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on May 14, 2006, for an unscheduled interview with Robert Howie, a bishop in the Mormon church.

The two sat down to discuss Gregson's temple privileges, which had previously been revoked.

Gerein said Gregson had been told to make some changes in his life but hadn't done so to Howie's satisfaction, so Howie was declining to give Gregson back his "temple recommend," which provides increased rights within the church.
Gerein said Gregson was angry and upset during the meeting, saying: "Just tell me what to do and give me my temple recommend back."

When Howie refused, Gregson pulled out a knife and put it on the desk, with the blade pointing toward Howie.
"You don't know how many ways I have been taught to kill a man ...," Gerein quoted Gregson as saying. "I am better with a knife than a pistol."

Gerein said Gregson then became distraught, saying he feared receiving a psychological examination by the RCMP because he felt he would fail it and lose his job.

Gerein quoted Gregson as saying: "I'm messed up. No one knows how messed up I am."

Court heard Howie was able to "talk him down," and the incident ended peaceably about 15 minutes later, with Gregson thanking Howie for refusing to give him the temple recommend.

Defence lawyer David Bishop said the 40-year-old Gregson has since had a shunt placed in his head to deal with the cysts, and is doing fine.

Taking into consideration the medical issues, Provincial Court Judge Bruce Henning accepted a joint recommendation for an 18-month conditional discharge with several conditions, including that Gregson perform 40 hours of community service, write a letter of apology and have no contact with Howie or his family. He cannot go to the Sangster Boulevard church.
He is currently on paid leave from the RCMP, and is status there is under review, Bishop said.

Three other charges were stayed against Gregson: Carrying a knife for a dangerous purpose, assault and intimidation.

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen



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